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on a republican line. -- our republican line. we will go to a caller from greensboro, mississippi. -- greens go, mississippi. -- greensville, mississippi. caller: i want to say congratulations to the president. host: this part of the white house is closed to vehicular traffic but open to tourists. the blue room is in the center of the white house. that is where the president took his official oath of office as dictated under the constitution. a few blocks away along massachusetts avenue, the vice president took the oath of office at 8:20 this morning. administered by the justice sonia sotomayer. >> i, joseph r. biden jr., do solemnly swear -- [repeats] >> that i will support and defend the constitution of united states -- [repeats] >> against all enemies, foreign and domestic -- [repeats] >> that i bear true faith and allegiance to the same -- [repeats] >> that i take this freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion -- [repeats] >> and that i will well and faithfully discharge -- [repeats] >> the duties of the office on which i am about to enter. [repeats] >> so help me god. [re
to thank mr. palazzo from mississippi who offered important suggestions to improve this legislation. i'm proud to be a co-sponsor and these bipartisan federal emergency management agency and disaster recovery improvements will speed up and streamline hurricane sandy recovery efforts. they'll also and importantly reduce costs. we work to target improvements that will specifically help communities in the immediate aftermath of sandy. these: critical bipartisan reforms supported by fema and key experts and stakeholders, including, we understand, from fema administrator few gait that these -- fugate that these must happen by march 1. i worked on these issues since serving on the committee with the gentlelady from washington, d.c. eight years ago. at that time i witnessed the devastation following hurricane katrina. we saw our emergency management capability broke down and significant reforms were needed. we crafted legislation that put fema back together again within the department of homeland security, reformed and strengthened our response capability and created pilot programs to test in
, the mississippi river, the straits of florida you look at the diversity in the gulf of mexico. then look at the challenges between, what i call the interaction between the man-made world and the natural world. this is a very important part of the world but also a very complex part of the world. what you get as we have an increasing population and expension of the infrastructure you have increasing interaction with the natural environment, greater degrees of complexity. when you introduce challenges like climate change and uncertainty, the level of the types of events that can occur there in terms of the magnitude and consequences grows. we know the frequency is increasing. we're going to talk about this unique area of the world from a couple of different perspectives. i would like you to think about a couple of things as we do this. this concept of restill yantcy. -- resiliantcy. having done many, many months in the gulf of several different disasters and crisis that were down there i came to think of resiliantcy similar to the human immune system. the pre-existing conditions are not cr
in mississippi. what we're building down there is an institute for modern slavery studies. if that voice is not put into all of this, it becomes an exercise in displacement and the revocation. that makes me and nationalist about the story but i want to tell about history here. when i was at the freedom center, standing at the wine bar, talking to two african american bartenders, they asked me why i was down there. i said and working for the national underground railroad for the center. their first reaction was, we don't care about that place, because they have moved away from our story. >> it is a much easier story to tell, but it does not challenge people. >> thanks. now you're doing research at a wine bar. i don't get it. [laughter] >> nice to meet you all. the one comment i would like to throw out there, bringing the survivor perspective into the discussion. the idea that these women did not see themselves as -- we served 500 people who have experienced what we're talking about today. there of all different descriptions. we have received about 3000 calls directly from people identifyi
. the beneficiaries that are targeted underserved communities in louisiana, mississippi, alabama, and the florida panhandle. there are four components to this. the first is a program serving the developing improved community health programs. it is run by louisiana public health institute joined with the alliance institute which is a community-based organization. there is a mental and behavioral health program which has louisiana state university, southern mississippi university, the university of south alabama and the university of west florida. there is a literacy program which includes a washington- based group. that's got the literacy aimed at the literacy of the community and the community workers and those involved in with community activism and community projects. finally, there is a community health worker training program that is based at the university of south alabama. the overall goal here is one where resilience comes up in the language all the time but the resilience is very much in keeping with what we would do in public health. yesterday there was a meeting held at e.p.a. by the e.
in the country along with the mississippi river in the valley area. if you remember the drop on a tour map, it shows that the drought was right in that central area. if you look at the western part of the map, it highlights vegetable and fruit production, and down in the southeast and florida, we are highlighting the major citrus-producing area with corn and grapefruit production. , joining's go to ruth us from here in washington, d.c. ruth, you with us? we will try one more time for ruth in washington. caller: yes, this is ruth. i have a question about the food prices. how high will food prices as a result of the drought, how high will they go? host: general question, but how high can we expect? guest: the forecast is that prices will rise about 3.5% this year. the long-term averages 3% a year, but it will rise faster than the overall inflation rates. the usda forecast for food price increases, and how much food prices increase over the year. some forecasters use month-to- month changes in prices, some have much higher or much different numbers than usda produces. fruit prices could be up
here and supported alabama, i supported mississippi, i supported texas, i was hoping that by now the northeast part of this country would have -- congress would have acted. it's been 77 days. those people are hurting. people in my district still can't get back to their homes and here we are in the last congress we just didn't do anything about it. now we're moving forward and hopefully january 15 we can get the rest of the money so those people that are suffering from all these states hit by this storm can get their lives back together again and i thank you, i yield back. >> gentleman yields back. does the gentleman from new jersey continue to reserve? >> i yield one minute for his floor debate, the gentleman from new york, sean patrick maloney. >> the gentleman from new york is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, my name is sean patrick maloney. i'm new here. i don't know all the rules of washington but it seems like the rule here is to put off till tomorrow what should be done today even when our fellow americans are suffering. a long time ago i honored from my mom and
was 7.3%. today, it is 5.6%. the second lowest east of the mississippi and the lowest in the southeast. during that time, virginia has created 160,000 jobs, mostly in the private sector. in 2011, we hit our all-time high record for agricultural exports, at $2.35 billion, bolstering virginia's largest industry. together we put in place a stronger environment in which the private sector can create good paying jobs, and virginia is now outperforming its neighboring states. we have also worked hard together to get our fiscal house in order. three years ago, together we closed a budget shortfall of $6 billion without raising taxes. the results were good. we have had three consecutive budget surpluses totaling $1.40 billion. we more than doubled the rainy day fund. we gave two 3% performance bonuses to our great state employees. we have maintained virginia aaa bond rating while the federal government was losing theirs. we bolstered agency efficiency. we eliminated and consolidated dozens of boards and commissions and agencies and programs to save money. we set priorities and cut spending. in
and the mississippi and colorado worked their way to the sea. think the work of our hands weaving steel into bridges, finishing one more report for the boss on time, stitching another wound or uniform, the first brush stroke and a portrait for the last floor of the freedom tower jutting into the sky that yields to our resilience. one sky, toward which we sometimes lift our eyes tired from work, some days guessing at the weather of our lives. some days giving thanks for a love that love you back. sometimes praising and mother who knew how to give or for giving a father who could not get what you wanted. we head home for the gloss of rain or weight of snow or the aplomb blush of dusk but always, always, home, always under once one sky, our sky, and tapping on the window of one country, all of us facing the stars,hope, a new constellation, waiting for us to map it, waiting for us to name it together. [applause] [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, it is now my privilege to introduce rev. dr. luis leon to deliver the benediction. >> let us pray -- gracious and the eternal god, as we conclude the second i
, louisiana, mississippi, texas. we didn't ask questions. we just stopped and delivered aid to those in need. this is important, it is important that members who have been the benefactor of our goodwill in the past remember this generosity when voting today. . almost three months later and my constituents continue to suffer. i urge passage of the rule and underlying bill and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from yields back. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: i'm pleased to yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. andrews. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized for 1 1/2 minutes. mr. andrews: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. andrews: i thank my friend for yielding. 78 days ago a tremendous force of fury hit the northeastern region of the united states. today we make an act of national interest. this is not an act of excess or an act of charity. for those who claim that there is excess in this bi
to reapply, there's about 56 of them in louisiana and mississippi, to reapply for loan forgiveness. it would be up to about $400 million up to the communities to apply including about 30 million that they've already paid us in principal and interest. so to me this is something that really shouldn't be in this bill. i'm not saying that it -- it may be important, may be critical but not part of the sandy supplemental. host: so if i'm hearing you correctly, there are things designated emergency within this but not necessarily specific to sandy. guest: right. and there are things in here where they're nice to have. for instance, even going all the way down to the small there's $20,000 for the department of justice inspector general to replace cars that were damaged by sandy i guess, i mean new equipment. well, the justice department has more than 40,000 vehicles. but i kind of think that they could take one out? this shouldn't be viewed as free money. that was proposed by the administration. it's also people in the administration wanting to feather their nest as well. host: as far as your analys
every time to louisiana, alabama, florida, mississippi, missouri, alabama have needed aid for disasters. new jersey and new york's representatives regardless of party have stood up for them. it's now time for them to stand up for this region of the country as well. this should not be subject to politics. this is a basic function of government. and yeah i'm concerned about it, because every day it doesn't happen is a day it doesn't happen. i can't take anybody's assurances anymore. \[inaudible question] >> my understanding is that the flood insurance program will run out of money next week if not refinanced by congress. and so the speaker's irresponsible action in not moving on anything at least appears from the information i have been given will leave the flood insurance program broke by the end of next week. \[inaudible question] >> i'm not concerned about that, but more the indecision that's the problem. we found in nondisaster-related times, the fact is they couldn't make a decision. so businesses sat for months and months and months waiting to be made. sitting on the governor's desk
of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, iowa, vermont, california and missouri in their times of need. now i trust that they will stand with us. so make no mistake. new jersey's spirit has never been stronger. our resolve never more firm. our unity never more obvious. let there also be no mistake -- much work still lies ahead. damage that comes only once in a century will take in some cases years to repair. here is some of what we have done already -- we have created a cabinet-level position to coordinate the state's efforts across every agency, and marc ferzan is here today, ready to work with you on this restoration effort. we've requested the federal government to pay 100% of the costs of the significant debris removal that we require -- and have already received $18 million for that task. we have secured $20 million from the federal highway administration for emergency repair of our roads, bridges and tunnels -- a down payment on a major infrastructure task ahead. we have directed our department of environmental protection to streamline approvals for restoring critical infrastruct
the tradition of providing relief. we have stood with the citizens of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, iowa, vermont, california and missouri in their times of need. with us. [applause] [applause] so make no mistake. new jersey's spirit has never been stronger. our resolve never more firm. our unity never more obvious. let there also be no mistake -- much work still lies ahead. damage that comes only once in a century will take in some cases years to repair. here is some of what we have done already -- we have created a cabinet-level position to coordinate the state's efforts across every agency, and marc ferzan is here today, ready to work with you on this restoration effort. we've requested the federal government to pay 100% of the costs of the significant debris removal that we require -- and have already received $18 million for that task. we have secured $20 million from the federal highway administration for emergency repair of our roads, bridges and tunnels -- a down payment on a major infrastructure task ahead. we have directed our department of environmental protection to str
somebody else she is talking to. >> we have quite a few ladies from jacksonville, mississippi. how did you all come together? how did this get organized? >> betsy is our coordinator. cannot have a chance to come up first four years. we knew he would get a second term. you were so excited to be in this place, in the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's speech. excitement to see obama add another clot for years to make change. >> how did you organize these ladies? >> we had a total of 41 people from jackson, mississippi. from the seeing. four years ago, i am just isolated to be here and to be able to bring more people from mississippi and celebrating martin luther king, his birthday, and also celebrating four more years of president obama. >> when did you decide to put this all together, and how did you do it? >> the day after the election. i didn't get word of mouth, and my name is out there, being a travel agent, and word of mouth, which went on and on. -- we went on and on. >> you took a bus? >> we left on january 19 at 4:00, and limit your january 20 at 11:00 -- we made it here janua
one sky. since the appalachians and sierras claimed their majesty, and the mississippi and colorado worked their way to the sea. thank the work of our hands: weaving steel into bridges, finishing one more report for the boss on time, stitching another wound or uniform, the first brush one sky, toward which we sometimes lift our eyes tired from work: some days guessing at the weather of our lives, some days giving thanks for a love that loves you back, sometimes praising a mother who knew how to give, or forgiving a father who couldnt give what you wanted. we head home through the gloss of rain or weight of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but alwayshome, always under one sky, our sky. and always one moon like a silent drum tapping on every rooftop and every window, of one country -- all of us -- facing the stars hope, a new constellation waiting for us to map it, waiting for us to name it together [applause] >> that is my pleasure to introduce reverend luis leon to deliver the benediction. >> let us pray. gracious and eternal god, as we conclude the second inauguration of president
, and connecticut. we can do this on the eastern seaboard, the gulf coast, the mississippi delta region, and the earthquake region. we are not and do not need to read about the wheel, either. all of these things have been done and we can continue to do it. on the jersey shore, and i know it is a much bigger area, being a mayor from the jersey shore, just coming from there this morning and talking to people on the ground, these are our needs. now we have to figure out how we match them to the policy, funding, and resources that are coming. i have had this experience several times, one of those christmas tree lights out in the yard and get them all throughout the bushes and down to the last strand, and you end up with two of the same, because you were not paying attention and they will not plug into each other. we want to make sure these resources and this funding and this will plugs into the needs of the people who need it. we are frustrated, we are tired , we are waiting, we want to read old. we understand, we certainly do, practically no one who think we will just rebuild exactly what
to your state. you know, as i sat here and supported alabama, i supported mississippi, i supported texas, i was hoping that by now the northeast part of this country would have -- congress would have acted. it's been 77 days. those people are hurting. people in my district still can't get back to their homes and here we are in the last congress we just didn't do anything about it. now we're moving forward and hopefully january 15 we can get the rest of the money so those people that are suffering from all these states hit by this storm can get their lives back together again and i thank you, i yield back. >> gentleman yields back. does the gentleman from new jersey continue to reserve? >> i yield one minute for his floor debate, the gentleman from new york, sean patrick maloney. >> the gentleman from new york is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, my name is sean patrick maloney. i'm new here. i don't know all the rules of washington but it seems like the rule here is to put off till tomorrow what should be done today even when our fellow americans are suffering. a long time ago
: mr. whitehouse of rhode island. mr. wicker of mississippi. the vice president: please raise your right hand. the vice president: please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear that you will support and dend the constitution of the united states against all enees, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that you take this obligion freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: io. the vice president: congratulations, senators. [applause] >> senators will carry out constitutional duties on friday when they walk over for a joint session of congress. they will count the local college votes. live cove on c-span 1:00 p.m. eastern. more with vice president biden who met with new and re-elected senators in the old senate chamber. the vice president does this at the start of each congress so the senators can have their photos of their swearing in with their families. >> congratulations, senator. >> than
for wildlife refuges in texas, $20 million in mississippi, and $74 for refuges in louisiana. the sponsor of this amendment's home state. one of the central responsibilities of this institution is to act on behalf of the american people whenever a major disaster occurs. federal disaster relief is meant to restore homes, businesses and communities and federal facilities to pre-disaster conditions. we do this whether it's a fire in the west, a tornado in the south or a hurricane in the northeast. there is no good reason to make an exception of the mckinney refuge here. the sponsor of this amendment has argued that this includes $9.8 million solely to repair the damage on the outer islands. this is not true. fish and wildlife required repairs for the mckinney refuge including $2 million. the rest of the funds would support repairs all along of 70 miles. by cutting the funding needed to rebuild the connecticut coastline, this amendment prevents the mckinney refuge from meeting its federal commitment to provide education and outdoor recreation for the public and unfairly singles out connecticu
mississippi and many other tribes to what's now oklahoma, and he held the floor for three days defending the people that had no right to vote, had no ability to defend themselves and trying valiantly to make sure they were allowed to retain their homeland and retain their identity and their rights. he wasn't successful in that fight, but he fought it nonetheless. frankly, it would be incredibly ungrateful for me now -- at the time of his people's greatest need to return the favor. i urge the passage of the rule. i urge the passage of the rogers amendment. i urge the passage of the rogers bill. i urge the passage of the frelinghuysen amendment to that bill. with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oklahoma reserves. the gentlelady from new york is recognized. ms. slaughter: good afternoon, mr. speaker, and i thank the gentleman for yielding me the customary 30 minutes and i yield myself such time as i may consume. i really appreciate the words of my colleague. we're very happy last night at the rules committee that all members of the rules co
offer those statistics earlier tonight about what is happening, poverty, in the state of mississippi. this is what we are talking about. this young woman is organizing a people and getting women together again to fight back and let their leaders here about the conditions that young people in poverty today are having to endure. tell me a bit about your work in mississippi. >> thank you for this opportunity. before i start to talk about my work, i would just like to say, bring a prison like my grandmother to the table, who was working at the hotel for 335 b 3:35 in the morning and at night time for the car factory on an acre and a half of land and a three-bedroom house, one bath and, and 20 of us in it. there is the true face of poverty. bring an expert like her to the table. her thing was to make sure we get educated. even as a young child, my escape from poverty was to get a good education. i knew once i got a good education, or at least tried to get a quality education, that would be my way out of poverty. that is what i continue to fight for. to build young people like me to lift o
supported alabama, mississippi, texas. i was hoping that by now the northeast part of this country -- congress would have acted. it has been 77 days. those people are hurting. he poll in my district still cannot get to their homes. here we are, in the last congress, we did not do anything. now we are moving forward, and hopefully, january 15 we can get the rest of this money so those people that are suffering in all of the states that were hit either the storm can get their lives back together again. >> gentleman yields back. does the gentleman from new jersey continue to reserve question mark >> i yield one minute to his floor debate, the gentleman from new york. >> my name is sean maloney. i am new here. i do not know all the rules of washington, but it sure seems like the rule here is to put off till tomorrow what should be done today, even when our fellow americans are suffering. a long time ago, i learned from my mom and dad and our parish rule.t and much better wil it is called the golden rule. people in new jersey and the hudson the late live by it. they let storm victims th
, a mississippi democrat, number four is collin peterson, a minnesota democrat, and all of those had about 11% turnover. . the third best member is representative bennie thompson, a mississippi democratcompare te that for the average office, and for several members over 50%. three of the top for our democratic house members, and then we have a senate republican. host: next up is david in california on our line for independents. caller: i wanted to know, is that behavior -- indicative of a psychopathic nature? [laughter]guest: i think we would need psychologist in here to answer that one third host: yeah. -- that one. host: yeah. sandra. go ahead. caller: i had a comment and a general question. i do not think it matters who you are working for. i have been in the private sector in my experience is it typically does not take a lot of experience to treat people decently. what bothers me is that would really impact my vote if i even got a hint of someone that is not treating people decently. i would not vote for them. i am a democratic support, a huge obama supporter, and what i have admired is w
, mississippi, part of the base of the republican party is done. we're talking about immigration, that's how he got elected. when you look at the base of the republican party and you look at the nra, it evolved into this. the only conversation we're having right now because of 20 dead white kids in connecticut. in every gunshot wound in costs $20,000. there's 20,000 or 30,000 black kids killed in the inner city because the widest people in this country are being manipulated by the radical white ring -- right-wing to vote for them. host: we will move on to an gayle king in louisiana, a democrat. what are your views on gun control and. -- moving on to gylayle in louisiana. caller: i'm actually in houston, texas. host: i apologize. tell us your views on gun control and whether they have changed. caller: no, my views have not changed. as long as people like wayne lapierre, the republicans and democrats afraid to lose their office, men, women, boys, girls, as long as there's money involved, it will never change. thank you. host: smitty is in farmington, new mexico on our republican line. caller: tha
what is happening, poverty, in the state of mississippi. about. we are going to leave the session ran now. the house will be back in for legislative business on tuesday, trouble, p.m. eastern. that gives federal employees a pay incress and just some of the news coming out of the republican treat that informs virginia. the house republicans leaders announced a plan to raise the debt limit for three months. the long-term increase would be con ting nt on the senate passing a bill by april 15. 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable louie gohmert to act as speaker pro tempore on this day, signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend andrew walton, capitol hill presbyterian church, washington, d.c. the chaplain: let us pray. god of light and life, we give thanks for the gift of the day. a day which stands on the threshold of possibility and potential for the presence and power of love. love ensconced in every human at creation. love, which we are called to share with one another, as well a
. there are many were worn in a farm in georgia or alabama or mississippi who are unaware of what was happening in their childhood where they lived. there lies were affected by this. their parents' lives have been circumscribed. these are immediately with us. they explain about the world we live in today. for us to confront those things and move toward whatever vision of america we ascribe to is almost impossible to move toward that effectively if we do not grapple with this element of our history that most of us to not understand very well. i should stop there. thank you. >> good morning. i was one of those people that was born in mississippi and a house on a plantation back during the war. my father and mother and family moved to the north when i was a baby. thank you for your work. i am going to talk about how prejudice has changed. the tale of two black boys, trayvon martin and emmitt till. separated by 1,000 miles and two states borders, and nearly six decades, two young african- american boys met tragic fates that seem remarkably similar today. both walked into a small market to buy candy
any pain. it is incredible. host: a couple of more phone calls for charles hurt. mary. in mississippi, republican caller. caller: i would like to point out to all of the democrats that are appeased this morning that he raised taxes on the rich, that all he has really done it is fed you a line because when he refuses to do away with the loopholes, and make the tax is fair, i mean, that is how they get away with not paying taxes -- although loopholes. basically, he has played to both sides. guest: it was said the problem with socialism is you run out of other people's money. again, that is what president obama told us yesterday -- we will run out of other people's money by what is now this year, and he will head to go back to the well, and lower the threshold for texas. -- taxes. i was thinking, greta, what would be a great idea -- currently there is no tax on political campaigns, but a wonderful incentive to make the tax code more fair is if they levied a tax on political campaigns. after all, they usually raise many millions of dollars. it is a million-dollar company. whatever the tax
. terry. boehner. thompson of california. pelosi. thompson of mississippi. pelosi. thompson of pennsylvania. boehner. thornberry. boehner. tiberi. boehner. tierney. pelosi. tipton. boehner. titus. pelosi. tonko. pelosi. tsongas. pelosi. turner. boehner. upton. boehner. valadao. boehner. van hollen. pelosi. vargas. pelosi. veasey. pelosi. vela. pelosi. vells a quezz -- vells a kess. pelosi. visclosky. pelosi. wagner. boehner. walberg. boehner. walden. boehner. with a lorsky. boehner -- walorski. boehner. walz. pelosi. wasserman schultz. pelosi. waters. pelosi. watt. pelosi. waxman. pelosi. weber of texas. boehner. webster of florida. boehner. welch of vermont. pelosi. went strup. boehner -- wenstrup. boehner. westmoreland. whitfield. boehner. williams. boehner. wilson of florida. pelosi. wilson of south carolina. boehner. wittman. boehner. wolf. boehner. womack. boehner. woodall. boehner. yarmuth. pelosi. yoder. boehner. yoho. cantor. young of alaska. boehner. young of florida. boehner. young of indiana. boehner. the speaker pro tempore: the reading clerk will now say the nam
at the table of brotherhood. >> i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering in the heat of oppression and injustice will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. >> i have a dream that my children will live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of the skin but by the content of their character. >> i have a dream that one day down in alabama, one day right there in alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and sisters and brothers. >> i have a dream today. >> i have a dream that one day every -- >> the glory of the lord shall be revealed. this is our hope and the faith that we have. this is the hope and the faith to go back to the south with. >> we will be able to heal the mountain of despair into hope and we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. >> with this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up and freedom together knowing
to the local officials, including the governor of mississippi, who are suggesting that if you succeed in getting new laws passed they won't enforce them on the gun issue? thosel, i didn't see particular remarks, john. there are a variety of actions that the president has proposed. some of them are executive actions. some of the most important of them, as the president made clear, require congressional action. and i'll leave it to lawyers to sort out, if we are fortunate enough to achieve these pieces of legislation, how those laws would be enforced. but let's be clear here. there is nothing the president proposed yesterday that would result, if enacted, in anyone -- any law-abiding citizen in america losing a gun. the president made clear yesterday his full support for the second amendment and the second amendment rights of american citizens. he also made clear that we have an obligation, and american citizens, including our most vulnerable, youngest american citizens, have rights, too. and we have an obligation to uphold those rights, including the rights of seven- year-olds to live
mississippi, she's from mississippi. sony was chairman of the veterans affairs committee. she was the press secretary. and so that's when i first met her in 1982 and we were married in 1985, and we just celebrated our 20th wedding anniversary in april. >> how old is your two kids? >> our daughter just turned 15, two weeks ago and our son just turned 13 two weeks ago. so that's a zone there that i'm constantly understanding and learning about, those teenage years. allan, our daughter is a freshman at oak crest, which is an all girls catholic schooln mcchain and our son is in potomac at an all boys school in the heights. >> would you put a label on yourself, conservative remember liberal, moderate? >> i think labels come as a result of your political philosophy and certainly in my case your voting record much and if you look at my voting record and if you look at my political philosophy it's conservative. i have one of the most conservative voting records in the united states senate. i suppose some people are perplexed by that because i challenge republican administration on the war and othe
. south carolina, mississippi, they started susceding. they said, we're out of here. so when he came to his inaugural speech on the first one, he was trying to keep the southern states in and trying to keep the border states from leaving. so he said some things that were so conciliatory that even the abolitionists at the time thought he wasn't what they were hoping for. he wasn't really against slavery. he said he was but they thought he didn't prove it. they thought he was too cautious and they criticized him for this. but every the civil war broke out and so much blood was spilled and so much harm was done to our nation, 620,000 people died in the civil war, president lincoln came back four years later, and on that speech his second inaugural speech was a bold defense of the union cause and an argument that slavery must go. and he didn't pull any punches on the second one. now, he was not boldacious. he was not offensive. he was trying to be as conciliatory as he could be, but he made very clear that america was going to be one whole and not divided and, two, it would be slave-free
: tony, olive branch, mississippi. republican. hi, tony. caller: good morning. how you doing, senator? guest: where is olive branch? caller: it's down across the street from memphis, tennessee -- mississippi. guest: i've been across the bridge there. host: what's your question or comment? caller: my deal is when you talk about congress and everybody is looking at discretionary spending, i beg it differ. we're funding the rhino but we can't take care of grandma. we're rebuilding mosques over in other foreign countries and yet little martha has to worry about her dad losing her dad and being out on the street and being homeless. we're not cutting we should be cutting. we send money to countries in south america and other places to improve their water system. so think about pipe in china and equipment in other countries and say, we'll do the labor. the government is sending more money overseas that should be cut. host: all right, tony, we'll get a response. guest: i don't know the last figure -- i tell everybody i once ran -- helped to run the foreign aid agency of this country in the ca
that this could happen to your state. you know, as i sat here and supported alabama, i supported mississippi, i supported texas, i was hoping that by now the northeast part of this country would have -- congress would have acted. it's been 77 days. those people are hurting. people in my district still can't get back to their homes. here we are in the last congress, we just didn't do anything about it. now we're moving forward and hopefully january 15 we can get the rest of this money so those people who are suffering in all these states that were hit by this storm can get their lives back together again. i thank the gentleman and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman -- does the gentleman from new jersey continue to reserve? the gentleman from new york. mr. meeks: i yield one minute for his floor debate, the gentleman from new york, sean patrick maloney. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. maloney: my name is sean patrick maloney, and i'm new here. i don't know all the rules of washington but it seems like the rule here is to put off
the upcoming episode. larry is joining us from biloxi, mississippi, on the independent line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i do not believe our congress or president are going to do anything different. they have laid out their lifestyles and the things they intend to do. they are looking for ways to decrease spending, but it seems to me we have elected some people to go into these positions to make our decisions for us. they seem to be self-serving. if you get an ineffective congressman who cannot do his job and has proven it by serving a couple of years and then gets voted out, that congressman still gets a pension for the rest of his life that is well over $100,000. we have thousands collecting this money. if you took a job and were expected to serve 20 years and do an effective job and could not do that, would you expect to get a pension for the rest of your life? why should we be paying these thousands of guys all this money? >> we go now live to the senate gallery for remarks from senator schumer on assistance to the victims of hurricane sandy. >> good afternoon. let me say a few
in the city of chicago. almost one out of 10 guns in chicago came to the city from mississippi. mississippi. why? the background checks there, the gun dealers there, or a lot easier than in other places. they ended up selling these guns and corrupting interstate fields on the way. here's the basics. i think we all agree and i hope we all agree that the supreme court decision said that we can have reasonable limitation on the second amendment right and terms of the type of weapon and the people who own them and the background checks on those people. it is something that we desperately need to do. we know that 40% of the sales are not going through the background checks. that is a huge problem. it has created an abundance of weapons that are available. in the straw purchases, i salute the chairman for addressing this issue. it is one of the worst situations in our estate and in the city of chicago. i can point to one gun store in illinois that accounts for more than 20% of the crime guns in chicago. straw purchasers buy the gun there and they end up in the hands of criminals in the city of ch
the biloxi, mississippi, independent line good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i don't believe the congress our president will do anything different. they pretty much laid out their lifestyles and the thing they intend to do. they looking for ways to decrease spending but it seems to me that we've elected some people to go into these positions to make our decision for us and they seem to be pretty much self-serving. if you get an ineffective congressman who can't do his job and proven can't do his job by going in there and serving couple years and then gets voted out, well that congressman still gets a pension for the rest of his life and it's well over $100,000. we got thousands of those guys out there collecting this money. if you took a job and or expected to serve 20 years and do ineffective job and couldn't do that, would you expect to get a pension for the rest of your life? why should we be paying these guys this money? ineffective? fire them and take their pension away. if they're effective, let them take it. host: larry thanks for the suggestion. ron has thi
in mississippi, this was the governor before haley barbour. i was painting on his house. he had about seven or eight illegal immigrants. i know they were, because he had one guy that knew how to speak english, and he had one guy that knew english and spanish both. he told those guys what to do. the next governor is saying you're doing a wonderful job and everything is working and stuff. he knew that they were illegal. so, in other words, if you got the politicians that already know they're illegal, even let them come in their own backyard and work, i put my brush down. i could not work any more for the man, i'm sorry. but he knew who they were and what they were doing, and the company that they were working for, you know, it was a big company that was running this tree service and stuff. they knew what they were doing. it's corrupt and put a lot of people out of work in america. and that's what happened to a lot of people. host: thanks for sharing your perspective and story. fawn johnson, any response to that? guest: yeah, i think the thing -- i was on the phone with an advocate actually fo
, the unemployment rate was 7.3%. today, it is 5.6%. the second lowest east of the mississippi and the lowest in the southeast. during that time, virginia has created 160,000 jobs, mostly in the private sector. in 2011, we hit our all-time high record for agricultural exports, at $2.35 billion, bolstering virginia's largest industry. together we put in place a stronger environment in which the private sector can create good paying jobs, and virginia is now outperforming its neighboring states. we have also worked hard together to get our fiscal house in order. three years ago, together we closed a budget shortfall of $6 billion without raising taxes. the results were good. we have had three consecutive budget surpluses totaling $1.40 billion. we more than doubled the rainy day fund. we gave two three% performance bonuses to our great state employees. we have maintained virginia aaa bond rating while the federal government was losing theirs. we bolstered agency efficiency. we eliminated and consolidated dozens of boards and commissions and agencies and programs to save money. we set priorities
stood with the citizens of florida and alabama, mississippi and louisiana, iowa and vermont, california and missouri in their times of need. now i trust they will stand with us. president >> obama on sunday signed a $9 billion aid bill for hurricane sandy flood relief programs. next tuesday the house is expected to vote on another bill with an additional $17 billion of aid and an amendment offering another $33.7 billion that would fund longer-term projects. you can see the speech at c- span.org and, as always, the house is live on c-span. >> tomorrow, the national governors' association will deliver the state of the state address. it will hear from the chair, the governor jack markell of delaware, and the vice chair. live coverage at 10:00 a.m. eastern. on c-span 2, a conversation on the future of afghanistan. that begins live at 10:00 eastern from the atlantic council. now, a hearing of nasa's mission looking at their strategic plans, robotic space flights, and private-public partnership. this house science and technology committee hearing is to end a half hours. -- two and a half hour
little- known fact is that he was a cheerleader at the university of mississippi. i am pleased to turn the floor over to mark shields. mark, please take it away. >> things for that great commentary on each of our distinguished panelists. as king henry viii said to each of his six wives, i will not keep you long. my job is to cull the wisdom on this stage tonight. i will just make two quick comments about the campaign that was finished, and it was a long campaign, and essentially humorless campaign. neither mr. romney nor mr. obama is a man given to self- deprecating lines, and perhaps the funniest guy turned out to be rick perry of taxes, who was there briefly, but rick perry stood up one night and told a group of us it was a strange feeling to stand next to mitt romney in each of those debates. he kept expecting mitt romney to lean over him and say, and you have any gray poupon. i like mitt romney as much as one good-looking guy can like another good looking guy and not be in violation of a texas state law. it was a marathon, and like most states marathons, the guy from kenya won. we
in the mail. host: here is the last call -- mississippi, independent line, go ahead caller: i retired in 2006 and i had $129,000 in my 401k and i kept reading on the internet that before obama was nominated, get your money out of the stock market. i did not think much about it and the week he was nominated, i had $92,000 left. i have talked to many other people and they lost like 75% of theirs. this has never been on the news or anything. i think this contributed to the stock market drop. guest: i appreciate your circumstance. when we look at the market decline that happened in 2008 and continued in 2009, it did not quite go down for everyone as broadly as it did in the circumstances you put forward. the market has come back a little bit and rebounded. often what happens is that when people see the market go down, we tend to pull out of the market at the wrong time and go in at the wrong time. we tend to over-invest when the market is going up and put more money in equities and less money in those fixed incomes that give you a lifetime -- host: nirs.org is the website -- thank you for your ti
the mississippi were to their way to the scene thank the work of our hands, weaving steel into bridges finishing one more report for the boss on time. did the first brush stroke on a portrait or a last floor on the freedom tower injecting into the sky that yield to our resilience. 01 sky we sometimes lift our eyes tired from work. some days giving thanks for a love that loved you back. some time praising a mother who knew how to give or for giving a father who cannot give what you wanted. we had a home through the loss of rain our way to snow or the palm blush of desk but always a home, always under one sky, our sky, and always one moon like the silent jump tapping on every wolf -- roof top of one country, all of us facing the stars. hope, a new constellation, which in for us to map its. waiting for us to name it together. [applause] >> that is my pleasure to introduce this doctor to deliver the benediction. >> let us pray. gracious and eternal god, as we conclude the second inauguration of president obama we ask for your blessings as we seek to become "citizens of a beloved community, loving yo
's hear from a republican, jimmy in mississippi. caller: good morning. several things. first off, the hispanic people, i have a great regard for those people, because they're very family-oriented. i do not have any problem with them coming into this country, as long as they are coming into this country legally. i think we can utilize our military. instead of people having to serve three or four times a going overseas, fighting in afghanistan or iraq, we can utilize our military and military intelligence to help on that. along with the good people that get across our borders, we get some very undesirables. i think terrorists are probably coming across our borders and we do not realize it. another point i would like to make, i don't think abortion should be used as a form of birth control. i can understand situations of or rape, then i would agree. i don't believe it should be used as birth control. the other point is our president went into this country on his first term talking about working on our infrastructure. we have a 300,000 bridges in this country that failed at a rate of
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